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Monday, December 22, 2014

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Program in Consumer Credit & Payments

About the Program in Consumer Credit and PaymentsAbout the Program in Consumer Credit & Payments

The program in Consumer Credit & Payments is a Bank-wide effort to advance our understanding of these markets and to make this information available to industry, consumers, policymakers, researchers, and the public at large. On these pages you will find research and analysis produced by the Bank's subject matter experts in Community Development Studies and Education, the Payment Cards Center, Research, Supervision and Regulation, and other areas.

Highlights

  • PCC publishes two new papers on Identity Theft:

    Payment Cards Center UpdatesDiscussion Paper Released: Consumer Use of Fraud Alerts and Credit Freezes: An Empirical Analysis

    Fraud alerts — initial fraud alerts, extended fraud alerts, and credit freezes — help protect consumers from the consequences of identity theft. We analyze a unique data set of anonymized credit bureau files to understand how consumers use these alerts. Read more.

    Payment Cards Center UpdatesWorking Paper Released: Identity Theft as a Teachable Moment

    This paper examines how instances of identity theft that are sufficiently severe to induce consumers to place an extended fraud alert in their credit reports affect their risk scores, delinquencies, and other credit bureau variables on impact and thereafter. Read more.

  • Consumer Credit and PaymentsPayment Cards Center Updates Consumer Credit & Payments Statistics

    The statistics are divided into a Consumer Credit Snapshot and a Consumer Payments Snapshot. They are derived from various sources including the Federal Reserve Payments Study (various years), the Federal Reserve Consumer Credit — G.19, and Federal Reserve Financial Accounts of the United States — Z.1.

  • Payment Cards Center UpdatesVisiting Scholar Working Paper Revised: Debt Collection Agencies and the Supply of Consumer Credit

    The author examines contract enforcement in consumer credit markets by studying third-party debt collection. The author finds that stricter regulations of third-party debt collection lead to fewer openings of revolving lines of credit. This effect appears to be the result of lower recovery rates due to fewer debt collectors per capita when debt collection laws are tightened.

  • Payment Cards Center UpdatesConference Summary Released: Consumer Financial Protection Regulations: How Do They Measure Up?

    The Payment Cards Center's September 2012 policy conference advanced the discussion of targeted design and outcome measurement as central features of public policy in the area of consumer financial protections. This conference summary describes the discussion of the data and methodology required and available for assessing the contribution of consumer financial protections to the advancement of, and the challenges inherent in, measuring social welfare.

What's new

November 2014

Payment Cards Center Updates Consumer Credit & Payments Statistics

The statistics are divided into a Consumer Credit Snapshot and a Consumer Payments Snapshot. They are derived from various sources including the Federal Reserve Payments Study (various years), the Federal Reserve Consumer Credit — G.19, and Federal Reserve Financial Accounts of the United States — Z.1.

October 2014

Visiting Scholar Working Paper Revised: Debt Collection Agencies and the Supply of Consumer Credit

The author examines contract enforcement in consumer credit markets by studying third-party debt collection. In order to identify the effect of debt collectors on credit supply, he constructs a state-level index of the tightness of debt collection laws. The author finds that stricter regulations of third-party debt collection lead to fewer openings of revolving lines of credit. This effect appears to be the result of lower recovery rates due to fewer debt collectors per capita when debt collection laws are tightened. Less stringent debt collection laws are associated with a larger and riskier pool of borrowers, consistent with the view that effective debt collection enables creditors to expand lending to new and risky borrowers.

  • Last update: November 19, 2014

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